Birmingham tenants back regeneration proposals

A review of the sustainability and viability of the Council’s 65,000 homes has identified 1279 properties as too expensive to maintain over the next 30 years.  The properties are mostly 1 and 2 bedroom flats and are not popular with residents.

A major consultation exercise showed that residents overwhelmingly backed the demolition proposals – a remarkable 82% of residents responded to the survey, and 83% of those responding were in favour of demolition. 

Over the next five years, the Council plans to demolish eight tower blocks, replace 54 bedsits in Weoley Castle with larger family homes and roll out the existing successful regeneration programmes in Newtown and Kings Norton. 

At the same time the Council is working on replacing the properties that will be demolished with new high quality family homes through the Birmingham Municipal Housing Trust.

Councillor John Lines, Cabinet Member for Housing, said: “We have a clear and coherent strategy to both build new homes for our people and to improve those properties within the Council stock that are worth investing in.

“Over the last few years we have spent over £800 million on improving the housing stock – over 99% of Council homes now meet the Government’s Decent Homes standard. At the same time we have to recognise that some properties are not worth further investment – either because they are too expensive to maintain, not popular with residents or do not offer the kind of housing that people will need in the future.

“The homes that are being demolished will be replaced with new family homes provided through the Birmingham Municipal Housing Trust or our Housing Association Partners and private developers. Last year 981 affordable homes were built in Birmingham and our Birmingham Municipal Housing Trust has a future development programme of 1340 new homes. That more than makes up for any losses through demolition.”

Ends

Notes to editors

  • The phased re-housing of owner occupiers and tenants will commence in April 2012 and will be completed by March 2017. 
  • The proposed demolitions generate overall savings of £81.507 million, over a 30- year period, with a net present value of £34.266 million
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